St Winifred’s Catholic Primary School

 

Behaviour Management

& Anti-Bullying Policy

 

 

Contents


A) INTRODUCTION
B) PRINCIPLES
C) ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
D) HOW APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR IS COMMUNICATED, DEVELOPED AND SUPPORTED
E) RULES
F) REWARDS
G) SANCTIONS
H) ADDITIONAL BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT OPTIONS
I) MALICIOUS ACCUSATIONS AGAINST STAFF
J) ANTI-BULLYING
K) MONITORING OF BEHAVIOUR STANDARDS

A) INTRODUCTION

St. Winifred’s is a caring community which aims to live out the Gospel values of love, justice, care and peace.  It is the policy of the school to treat all members of our community with dignity and respect.

It is our firm belief that good behaviour and good learning and teaching are inextricably linked.  We do not tolerate fighting, bullying, racism, rudeness, dishonesty, theft, persistent disruption or unkindness.  We believe that pupils respond best to praise and encouragement rather than negative criticism.  This is reflected in the way in which rewards and sanctions are used.

The Governing Body has responsibility for setting down guidelines on standards of behaviour and discipline and for monitoring their effectiveness.  Staff, pupils and parents all have roles to play in creating and maintaining a safe and supportive environment in which learning can thrive.

Related Policies

  • Discipline
  • Inclusion
  • SMSC
  • Safeguarding

B) PRINCIPLES

  1. It is important to communicate, teach, and develop appropriate behaviour skills so that all pupils are certain to understand the expected behaviour standards, and have an equal opportunity to meet them.
  2. All pupils must be treated equally if they meet, or fail to meet, behaviour expectations.
  3. Behaviour that meets the school’s expectations is to be rewarded, and unwanted behaviour is subject to a series of escalating sanctions where the child has several chances to make choices.
  4. Persistent unwanted behaviour is most likely to improve when the school is working in close co-operation with the child’s parent or carer, and all parties have a clear, written understanding of the issues and the actions.  Exclusion is seen as a last resort.
  5. The school must be able to access additional services in order to support children who are finding it particularly difficult to meet or maintain the expected behaviour standards.
  6. The Health and Safety of all school stakeholders is paramount

 

C) ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Head Teacher

  • Ensure that all staff members (including supply teachers) are aware of the school behaviour policy and that it is implemented consistently throughout the school.
  • Ensure that all stakeholders have easy access to the school behaviour policy and have understood it.
  • Regularly make clear to pupils that bullying, harassment and oppressive behaviour in any form is totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated.
  • Ensure that the effectiveness of behaviour management is incorporated within the school’s performance management system.
  • Exclude individual children for serious acts of misbehaviour. For repeated or very serious acts of anti-social behaviour the head teacher may permanently exclude a child.

Staff 

  • Set high expectations of all the pupils.
  • Ensure that this behaviour policy is understood by every child, and applied consistently in their class, around the school, and on school trips.
  • Treat each child fairly and equally.
  • Deal with the incidences of misbehaviour as soon as they arise in an appropriate manner, stressing that it is the action that is unacceptable and not the child. If the misbehaviour continues or is severe the class teacher seeks help and advice from colleagues.
  • Contact parents / carers if they have concerns about the behaviour or welfare of a child.
  • Praise and highlight good work, behaviour and actions.

Parents

  • Familiarise themselves with the school rules as set out in the parents /carers information booklet and the guidance set out in the home school agreement to support the school in their application.
  • Be involved in decisions made regarding the behaviour management and learning of their child.
  • Send their child to school in a fit state to learn and inform the school with concerns or change of circumstances that may have an impact on their child’s performance at school. Members of staff do not want to pry into private lives but if there are changes or upsets at home that might make a child unsettled at school it is better they know this so that any changes of behaviour can be seen and dealt with in context.
  • Inform the class teacher immediately if they feel that their child might be being bullied or be the perpetrator of bullying.

 

D) HOW APPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR IS COMMUNICATED, DEVELOPED AND SUPPORTED

  • Expectations of behaviour are described in specific language that children can understand, and published/displayed prominently around the school.  These are reproduced in this policy in the section below on ‘Rules’.
  • The school’s overarching SMSC framework, and specifically the Unicef ‘Rights Respecting Schools’ programme helps children to learn and develop healthy relationship skills, peaceful conflict resolution, communication around misunderstandings, and an understanding of their own emotions.
  • The playground has been designed in a way that provides dedicated physical space for quiet time, reflection/cooling off, calm play, as well as zones for more energetic play.  This is in part to help children self-regulate their emotions and not escalate into conflict.
  • School staff are present at playtime and lunchtime
  • The peace garden is specifically used for conflict resolution and to think about actions
  • Play leaders are present at lunchtime so children have the opportunity of  activity based play

E) RULES (Charter)

(To be displayed in every classroom)

We will always

  1. Remember that we share responsibility for our own behaviour and learning with all adults in our school community.
  2. Respect and care for each other and all adults in our school community.
  3. Greet and treat visitors to our school with respect and care.
  4. Stop, look at and listen to all adults when they are speaking to us.
  5. We do not interrupt teaching and as a consequence distract others from learning
  6. Take care of our school, its environment and all school equipment within it.
  7. Take care and responsibility for our own property.
  8. Always walk quietly in and around school.
  9. Wear the correct school uniform smartly with pride.
  10. Only bring to school the money we need for dinners or for special occasions.
  11. Only wear watches to school; all other jewellery we will leave at home.In the Playground we will always
    1. Play fairly, safely and co-operatively with each other.
    2. Show our respect and care for each other by our kind words and actions.
    3. Appreciate other children’s rights to enjoy their playtimes.
    4. Value our ‘quiet zone’ and the rights of those who use it.
    5. Tell an adult if we are hurt or need help.
    6. Only use school equipment in the playground and share it.
    7. Stay in our playground during playtimes unless told to do otherwise by an adult.  If it is raining before school starts we will go to the Hall.
    8. Ask an adult if we need to leave the playground or go beyond the marked zones.
    9. Stand still and be quiet when the first bell rings and then walk to the line and be ready and lined up in silence when the second bell rings.
    10. Remember that we should walk into the school calmly and quietly, remaining in line.

    A set of overarching ‘Golden Rules’  for behaviour are displayed in prominent places and explored in assemblies throughout the year. Our Golden Rules are:

    Our Golden Rules

    We lay strong foundations for learning

     Be a good member of our school community:

    • Treat others with kindness, love, generosity and compassion
    • Value others’ differences

    Be respectful and polite:

    • To others and the environment
    • Be proud of yourself and your school
    • Listen and be a good audience

    Be determined:

    • Try your best for yourself and others
    • Work hard and never give up hope

    Be motivated:

    • Challenge yourself in your learning
    • Have the courage to try new things

    Be truthful and honest:

    • Treat others as you would like to be treated
    • Show you can be trusted

     

    Be responsible:

    • Always make the right choices
    • Be calm and focused

     

    F) REWARDS

    These are available to all staff within the school and will be used in the order set out below as much as possible.

    Praise

    • Praise and positive verbal comments that are specific to the child’s work or actions
    • Positive written comments that are specific to the child’s work or actions
    • Praise and other positive reinforcers that are specific to the child’s work or actions e.g. stickers, applause.

    Showing excellent work

    • To peers
    • To staff
    • To the head teacher
    • By displaying it in the class in a special place

    Sharing examples of good actions

    • With peers
    • With staff
    • With the head teacher
    • With parents / carers

    Verbal or written messages that share good news about a child’s work, behaviour or actions

    • To staff
    • To the head teacher
    • To parents / carers

    Activity choice / responsibilities

    • Rewarded for work or actions by choosing an activity
    • Rewarded for work or actions by being given a task or responsibility

    Golden Achievers ( Yr2 – Y6)

    Once a month, one child from each class is nominated as  a Golden Achiever, their photograph and the reason for their nomination is displayed on the special board in the entrance area.  The nomination can be to reward progress or behaviour.

     Merits

    A system is in place whereby a child can be awarded a ‘merit’ by any member of staff for good work, behaviour or actions. Names are written in the ‘Merit Book’ and read out in Whole School Merit Assembly each Monday or Wednesday.

     Head teacher’s award

    When children have been asked to share their good work or behaviour with the Head Teacher, they are immediately given a special sticker.  This is called a Head teacher’s award.  Pupils may wear this sticker home or have the sticker placed on their work for their parents to see in their books.

    Good Work Assemblies

    The whole school applauds children during a Good Work assembly.  All the above are in line with the general approach that, where possible, praise should be public and any reprimanding private.

    Class Reward Time

    In order to promote the children’s sense of responsibility for their class as a whole, Class Reward Time can be earned for good behaviour by everyone. This is recorded on a sticker chart, each sticker representing a period of reward time that is built up over the year and can be used for a ‘treat’ at the end of the half term ..  Teachers may use ‘table points’ or ‘stickers’ to determine their class rewards

    G) SANCTIONS

    This section describes the strategy for dealing with behaviour issues in both the classroom and the playground.  Our aim is to replace negative behaviour with positive behaviour whilst maintaining the child’s personal dignity.   Sanctions should be meaningful and relative to the child. Non-trivial behaviour incidents are recorded in the Incident Log maintained by the Headteacher.

     Classroom sanctions:

    There are to be 4 steps used when Rules are broken.  Every child starts each day on a clean slate.
    Following normal reminders for children to keep to the rules, children only move through the steps by choosing to continue breaking the rules. Remind them they have a choice at each step.

    Step 1: verbal warning given by the member of staff
    Step 2: name written on the board as a visual reminder to the child that they have reached this stage
    Step 3: The persisting behaviour issue will be recorded in the class incident book and the child will lose their next playtime and be asked to write a ‘Sorry’ letter to the Teacher.
    Step 4: If the child has to be warned again after losing playtime the child reports to either the Head Teacher or Deputy Head Teacher.  The Head Teacher or Deputy Head Teacher will decide whether or not it is appropriate to inform parents.

    Playground sanctions:

    The playground needs to be a safe place for everyone; high standards of behaviour are expected in the playground.  Any form of fighting is unacceptable – ‘play fighting’ often leads to real fighting and will not be allowed.  Unwanted physical or verbal behaviour in the playground carries the following sanctions:

    • The child can be asked to sit on the wall for 5 minutes.
    • The child can be asked to apologise face to face or in a letter.
    • If the child has to be warned again the child reports to either the Head Teacher or an Assistant Head Teacher.  The Head Teacher or Deputy Head Teacher will decide whether or not it is appropriate to inform parents.

    Reflection

     Reflection is a sanction that includes the opportunity for a child to say sorry and reflect on any action that has caused upset to a member of the school community.  In this situation they will spend their playtime writing  sorry letters and  apologise in person if appropriate.

    What happens when the unwanted behaviour persists?

    If a pupil is sent to the Deputy Head or Head teacher three times in a term, Parents/carers will be invited to attend a meeting with the school, the Class teacher meets with parents / carers and pupil to discuss the unwanted behaviour.

    The specific behaviour to be monitored is fully discussed with the pupil and recorded in the form of a written Individual Behaviour Plan to support the child, parent and school, specifying what each party will do to help the child’s behaviour improve to the expected level.  A date is set to review the progress of the Individual Behaviour Plan within 6 weeks.

    The school’s Safeguarding Policy is followed if the school believes the behaviour under review gives cause to suspect a child is suffering, or is likely to suffer significant harm.  The result of this will instigate a multi agency assessment.

    Exclusion

    The ultimate sanction is exclusion, which the Head Teacher might decide is appropriate for very serious incidents.  In the first instance exclusions will be for a fixed-term, but persistent offences of a serious nature might lead to permanent exclusion.  Further details of the procedures to be followed related to exclusions are contained in the Pupil Discipline Policy.

    H) ADDITIONAL BEHAVIOUR SUPPORT OPTIONS

    As part of creating the most effective Individual Behaviour Plan to support the child, the school has recourse to a range of optional additional support strategies.  The objective is to create a tailored plan that meets the specific needs of each child who is demonstrating persistent behaviour difficulties.

    Parents meet with the Head teacher and the SEN Co-ordinator (SENCO) to agree support strategies and targets to help the child improve their behaviour. The SENCO will be involved in any referral of the child to outside agencies.   A review date is set.

    Additional support strategies include:

    1. New Woodlands outreach centre
    2.  Learning Mentor
    3. Speech and Language Therapist
    4. Attendance Advisory Service
    5. Child and Adolescent Mental Health
    6. Educational Psychologist

    I) MALICIOUS ACCUSATIONS AGAINST STAFF

    The definition of a malicious allegation is where ‘there is clear evidence to prove there has been a deliberate act to deceive and the allegation is entirely false’ (DfE Guidance)

     If an allegation is made against a member of staff a quick resolution of the allegation will be a clear priority.  The allegation will be investigated as per DfE guidance ‘Dealing with allegations about teachers and other staff’ (http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/d/dealing%20with%20allegations%20of%20abuse%20october%202012.pdf) .

    J) ANTI-BULLYING

    Bullying of any kind is completely unacceptable at St. Winifred’s.   Ignoring bullying is wrong and everyone who witnesses or knows about a bullying incident has a duty to intervene, get help and report it. In all cases of bullying we will show a consistent response of strong disapproval.  Any incident will be seen as an opportunity to reinforce our belief that behaviour is learned and can be changed and then help the bully to change their behaviour.

    Definition of bullying

    Bullying is defined as deliberately hurtful behaviour, by an individual or more children, repeated or over a period of time, where it is difficult for those being bullied to defend themselves.  The three main types of bullying are:

    • Physical (pushing, hitting, kicking, theft)
    • Verbal (name calling, persistent teasing, threats)
    • Indirect (spreading rumours, excluding someone from social groups)

    It is important for children, parents and carers to recognise that the following behaviours are not examples of bullying:

    • Occasional loss of temper
    • Hurting by accident
    • Falling in and out with friends
    • Minor disagreements
    • Not being friends with someone

    However bullying often involves a pattern of these behaviours.

    Response to bullying incidents

    The following steps will be taken when dealing with incidents:

    • If bullying is suspected or reported the member of staff who has been approached will deal with the incident immediately. They will collect as much information as possible from the receiver and any possible witnesses;
    • A clear account of the incident will be recorded on the Incident Form and given to the Head Teacher;
    • The Head Teacher will interview all concerned and record action taken;
    • All relevant staff will be kept informed;
    • Appropriate measures will be used in consultation with all concerned;
    • A follow-up plan will be agreed to monitor behaviour of those concerned.

     

    Pupils who have been bullied will be supported by:

    • Offering an immediate opportunity to discuss the experience with a member of staff;
    • Reassuring the pupil;
    • Restoring self-esteem and confidence;
    • Being able to approach a named adult for support.

     

    Pupils who have bullied will be helped by:

    • Discussing what happened;
    • Discovering why the pupil became involved;
    • Establishing the wrongdoing and the need to change;
    • Working with parents / carers to help change the attitude of the pupil;
    • Approaching a named adult for support;
    • Circle time.

     

    Detecting and monitoring bullying

    Bullying often happens in secret and is accompanies by threats not to tell.   In order for us to be able to find out about undisclosed bullying we will:

     

    • Have a ‘worry box’ so that children or adults can anonymously report bullying;
    • Ensure a named member of staff analyses the accident report book each week to look for patterns and warning signs;
    • Ensure that the Head Teacher or Deputy Head Teacher always responds to phone calls or letters from parents concerning bullying behaviour and records actions to be taken;
    • Ensure that all playground supervisors report concerns to the Head Teacher and / or Deputy Head Teacher for investigation;
    • Head Teacher will ensure that all teaching and support staff receive specific training and are vigilant about responding to bullying;
    • Senior Leadership Team will ensure that all staff are kept informed about reported incidents and appropriate follow-up procedures.

    K) MONITORING OF BEHAVIOUR STANDARDS

    The School governing body regularly receives and examines information on behaviour standards, given the close link between behaviour issues, pace of learning and academic achievement.  The following behaviour-specific measures are used in termly reporting to the governing body:

    • Record of behaviour incidences in the play ground that have caused first aid
    • The number of parental concerns expressed to teachers re: behaviour
    • The number of Individual Behaviour Plans carried out during the term (categorised into bullying or behaviour).

     

    Reviewed: September 2016

    Next Review: September 2017